VACCINE

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An inspector examines fresh beef sides for potential contaminants or health issues before the meat is cooled for 42 hours at a Cargill meat packing plant in Fort Morgan, Colo. Cargill is participating in trials of a cattle vaccine for e-coli among undertaking other measures to control the harmful-to-humans pathogen that can come from meat contaminated by cattle feces. (Kevin Moloney for the New York Times)
An inspector examines fresh beef sides for potential contaminants or health issues before the meat is cooled for 42 hours at a Cargill meat packing plant in Fort Morgan, Colo. Cargill is participating in trials of a cattle vaccine for e-coli among undertaking other measures to control the harmful-to-humans pathogen that can come from meat contaminated by cattle feces. (Kevin Moloney for the New York Times)
Filename: E-Coli_Cattle_Vaccine_28.jpg
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