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Dried lake bed cracks as the Colorado River cuts a new channel through years of lake sediment deposits near Hite, Utah. The drying mud develops cracks up to five feet deep. Water levels in the Lake Powell reservoir, created by Glen Canyon Dam, have dropped by some 100 feet in the last three years of driought in the West. Now with low water the river is eroding those lake sediments and washing them further into Lake Powell, geologist Dr. John C. Dohrenwend asserts. He is studying the creation of the Colorado River's delta at Lake Powell and the erosion and motion of sediments into the lake. Dohrenwend, a retired U.S. Geological Survey geologist, fears the sediment flow may fill the reservoir more quickly than the builders of the Glen Canyon Dam thought. This would reduce the storage capacity of the reservoir and possibly compromise the dam itself. (Kevin Moloney for the New York Times)
Dried lake bed cracks as the Colorado River cuts a new channel through years of lake sediment deposits near Hite, Utah. The drying mud develops cracks up to five feet deep. Water levels in the Lake Powell reservoir, created by Glen Canyon Dam, have dropped by some 100 feet in the last three years of driought in the West. Now with low water the river is eroding those lake sediments and washing them further into Lake Powell, geologist Dr. John C. Dohrenwend asserts. He is studying the creation...
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